GI360 stool profile / Doctor's Data

The GI 360 gives full insight into the root causes of dysbiosis.

This test is also useful for:

- Gastrointestinal Symptoms

- Inflammation

- Joint Pain

- Mucosal Barrier Dysfunction

- Autoimmune Disease

- Food Sensitivities

- Chronic or Acute Diarrhea

- Abdominal Pain

- IBD/IBS

- Nutritional Deficiencies

- Bloody Stool

- Fever and Vomiting

Actinobacteria

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Actinobacteria is one of the largest bacterial phyla, comprised of Gram-positive bacteria.

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Actinomycetales

Optimal range: 0 - 0 %

Actinomycetales are considered low abundance colonizers of the gastrointestinal tract with primary residence on the skin.

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Alistipes onderdonkii

Optimal range: 0 - 0 %

- Alistipes does not contribute significantly to short chain fatty acid production.

- A diet rich in animal protein and fat increases the abundance of Alistipes.

- High abundance of Alistipes was identified as a possible predictor of successful weight loss.

- Alistipes may positively correlate with depression.

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Alistipes spp.

Optimal range: 0 - 0 %

Alistipes does not contribute significantly to short chain fatty acid production. A diet rich in animal protein and fat increases the abundance of Alistipes. High abundance of Alistipes was identified as a possible predictor of successful weight loss. Increased abundance of Alistipes has been correlated with a greater frequency of pain in pediatric irritable bowel syndrome patients.

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Bacteroides pectinophilus

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Bacteroides pectinophilus contributes to breakdown of dietary pectins which are prebiotics. Pectins are complex, plantderived carbohydrates that are indigestible by human enzymes, but can be easily degraded by certain commensal bacteria in the gut.

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Bifidobacterium spp.

Optimal range: 0 - 0 %

Considered amongst the most beneficial commensal bacteria in the human gut, Bifidobacterium spp. are able to degrade monosaccharides, galacto-, manno-, and fructo-oligosaccharides, as well as some complex carbohydrates. Many of the non-digestible oligosaccharides, found as natural components in mother’s milk, select for colonization of these species which dominate the infant gut shortly after birth.

Bifidobacteria may provide health benefits directly through interactions with the host, and indirectly through interactions with other microorganisms. Bifidobacterium spp. take part in production and adsorption of vitamins, such as vitamins K and B12, biotin, folate, thiamine, riboflavin, and pyridoxine.

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Carbohydrates

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Simple sugars are absorbed in the small intestine and should not be appreciably present in the colon because they are a primary energy source for pathogenic or dysbiotic bacteria and yeast.

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Citrobacter farmeri / amalonaticus

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Citrobacter spp., a gram-negative bacterium and member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is considered dysbiotic at 3+ or greater. Citrobacter freundii complex (including C. freundii, C. braakii, C. gullenii, C. murliniae, rodentium, C. wermanii, C. youngae, C. koseri and C. farmeri) can cause diarrheal disease.

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Clostridium methylpentosum

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Appropriate digestion and metabolism of complex dietary carbohydrates from plants drives healthy diversity in the gut microbiota. Clostridium methylpentosum ferments the naturally occurring sugar L-rhamnose that is released by microbial breakdown of plant-derived pectin.

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Eubacterium hallii

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Eubacterium hallii and Eubacterium rectale are both part of the Lachnospiraceae family that is in the Firmicutes phylum.

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Faecalibacterium prausnitzii

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is one of the most abundant butyrate producing bacteria in a healthy gastrointestinal tract.

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Klebsiella pneumoniae/variicola

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Klebsiella spp. are gram-negative bacilli belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae family and closely related to the genera Enterobacter and Serratia. Klebsiella spp. are widely distributed in nature and in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. In humans, they may colonize the skin, oral cavity, pharynx, or gastrointestinal tract.

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Phascolarctobacterium spp.

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Phascolarctobacterium faecium can produce short-chain fatty acids, including acetate and propionate, and may be associated with metabolic effects and mental state of the host.

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Ruminococcus gnavus

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Members of Ruminococcus sensu produce acetate, but not butyrate.

Ruminococcus gnavus, like Akkermanisia muciniphila is a mucin degrading specialist. 

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Streptococcus salivarius ssp.

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Higher abundance of S. salivarius and S. thermophilus (Firmicutes phylum) have been associated with a moderate to severe disease course in newly diagnosed ulcerative colitis (UC) patients.

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Yeast

Optimal range: 0 - 0 Units

Yeast may normally be present in small quantities on the skin, in the mouth and intestine. While small quantities of yeast may be normal, yeast observed in higher quantities is considered abnormal.

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