EARLY SJOGRENS SYNDROME PROFILE

Sjögren syndrome is an autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocyte infiltration of exocrine glands, which manifests as dry eyes and mouth. The syndrome is estimated to be between 9 and 20 times more common in women than in men and typically presents in the 4th or 5th decade of life. The disease can present by itself (primary) or in association with another underlying autoimmune condition (secondary), commonly rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Sjögren syndrome may occur as part of a triad that includes primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and autoimmune thyroid disease. Patients with Sjögren's syndrome also have an overall increased risk for malignancies, specifically non-Hodgkin lymphoma and thyroid cancer.

Sjogren's syndrome (SS) is a systemic disease in which loss of salivary gland and lachrymal gland function is associated with hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibody production, mild kidney and lung disease and eventually lymphoma. SS involves dry eyes and dry mouth without systemic features that may be either primary or secondary to another autoimmune disease, such as SLE. Patients with SS and picked up at a late stage in their disease, after the salivary glands and lachrymal glands are already destroyed, because they are asymptomatic until that time. At this point, only symptomatic treatment can be offered for abnormal lachrymal and salivary gland function. The diagnosis for SS is currently at a crossroad with the American College of Rheumatology providing which requires characteristic autoantibodies (SS-A/SS-B) or minor salivary gland biopsy. Since lip biopsies are not frequently performed in clinical practice, there is increased emphasis placed on autoantibodies in diagnosis. The current Ro and La antibodies can delay the diagnosis by over 6 years. Recently novel antibodies have been identified: salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA6) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) using western blot methodology. Further studies have shown that the isotype differentiation of the markers adds to the sensitivity of diagnosis of SS. These autoantibodies occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La. In addition antibodies to SP-1, CA-6 and PSP were found in patients meeting the criteria for SS who lacked antibodies to Ro or La. Furthermore, in patients with idiopathic xerostomia and xerophthalmia for less than 2 years, 76% had antibodies to SP-1 and/or CA6 while only 31% had antibodies to Ro or La.

Antibodies to different isotypes (IgG, IgM & IgA of SP-1, CA6 and PSP are useful markers for identifying patients with SS at early stages of the disease or those that lack antibodies to either Ro or La.

The novel antibodies salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA VI) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) have shown to be present in animal models for Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and patients with the disease. The antibodies SP-1, CA VI and PSP occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La.

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The novel antibodies salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA VI) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) have shown to be present in animal models for Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and patients with the disease. The antibodies SP-1, CA VI and PSP occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La.

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The novel antibodies salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA VI) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) have shown to be present in animal models for Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and patients with the disease. The antibodies SP-1, CA VI and PSP occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La.

LEARN MORE

The novel antibodies salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA VI) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) have shown to be present in animal models for Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and patients with the disease. The antibodies SP-1, CA VI and PSP occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La.

LEARN MORE

The novel antibodies salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA VI) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) have shown to be present in animal models for Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and patients with the disease. The antibodies SP-1, CA VI and PSP occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La.

LEARN MORE

The novel antibodies salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA VI) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) have shown to be present in animal models for Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and patients with the disease. The antibodies SP-1, CA VI and PSP occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La.

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SALIVARY PROTEIN 1 (SP 1) IGA ANTIBODIES

Optimal range: 0 - 20 EU/ml

The novel antibodies salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA VI) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) have shown to be present in animal models for Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and patients with the disease. The antibodies SP-1, CA VI and PSP occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La.

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SALIVARY PROTEIN 1 (SP 1) IGG ANTIBODIES

Optimal range: 0 - 20 EU/ml

The novel antibodies salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA VI) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) have shown to be present in animal models for Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and patients with the disease. The antibodies SP-1, CA VI and PSP occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La.

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SALIVARY PROTEIN 1 (SP 1) IGM ANTIBODIES

Optimal range: 0 - 20 EU/ml

The novel antibodies salivary gland protein 1 (SP-1), carbonic anhydrase 6 (CA VI) and parotid secretory protein (PSP) have shown to be present in animal models for Sjogren's syndrome (SS) and patients with the disease. The antibodies SP-1, CA VI and PSP occurred earlier in the course of the disease than antibodies to Ro or La.

LEARN MORE
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