VibrantAmerica

Akkermansia muciniphila

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Alloprevotella

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Alpha Gliadin IgG

Optimal range: 0 - 0.9 Units

Gliadin constitutes a class of proteins that are present in wheat and other cereal which give it the ability to rise properly when baked. The main types of gliadin are alpha, beta, gamma and omega gliadins. Research has suggested that antibody reactivity against all the above mentioned forms of gliadin are found in individuals with ‘Wheat related disorders.’

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Amylase/Protease Inhibitors IgG

Optimal range: 0 - 0.9 Units

Non-gluten proteins constitute about 25% of the total protein content of wheat cereal. Recently it has been shown that these non-gluten proteins are immune-reactive in individuals with wheat sensitivity. The 5 groups of non-gluten proteins which are distinctly different from the gluten proteins that are responsible for inflammation in patients with wheat sensitivity are serpins, purinins, farinins, amylase/protease inhibitors and globulins.

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Anti-Actin IgG

Optimal range: 0 - 0.9 Units

Actin is responsible for regulating paracellular flow across the intestinal epithelium. However, increased levels of actin suggest epithelial cell damage leading to increased intestinal permeability and decreased barrier function.

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Anti-LPS IgA

Optimal range: 0 - 30 Units

High levels of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) antibodies are indicative of penetration of LPS into the bloodstream. LPS binds to cells lining the gut and increases synthesis of pro-inflammatory substances.

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Anti-Zonulin IgG

Optimal range: 0 - 0.9 Units

Zonulin acts as the gate-keeper between the cells of the intestinal lining in order for nutrients and other essential molecules to be transported in and out of the intestine. However, when leaky gut is present, the intestinal lining is compromised allowing larger protein molecules to get into the bloodstream thereby causing an immune response.

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Bacillus coagulans

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Bacillus coagulans (B. coagulans) is a type of probiotic ("good" bacteria). It isn't naturally found in the body, but it produces lactic acid in the gut.

Because B. coagulans produces lactic acid, it's often misclassified as lactobacillus. Unlike lactobacillus, B. coagulans forms spores. Spores are important for telling B. coagulans apart from other lactic acid bacteria.

People take B. coagulans for constipation and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). It is also used for diarrhea, gas, indigestion, and many other conditions, but there is no good scientific evidence to support these other uses.

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Bacteroides

Optimal range: 0 - 20 Relative Abundance

Species in the genus Bacteroides carry out broad metabolic functions, including degradation of complex plant polysaccharides, proteolytic activities, de-conjugation of bile acids, mucosal barrier integrity, short chain fatty acid production, fatty acid storage and glucose metabolism. 

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Bifidobacterium bifidum

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Bifidobacterium infantis

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Bifidobacterium infantis is a highly specialized microbe ("beneficial bacteria") that resides in the gut microbiome.

Unlike most other bacteria in the gut microbiome, Bifidobacterium infantis (also known as "b infantis") is an inherited microbe, often being passed down from mother to child during child birth. 

Once it takes up residence in the gut microbiome, Bifidobacterium infantis flourishes and helps to cultivate an environment where other beneficial bacteria can grow. 

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Bifidobacterium lactis

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Bifidobacterium lactis is also known as Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis;

They are typically gram-positive, anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium which can be found in the large intestines of most mammals, including humans.

Bifidobacterium lactis is the species of Bifidobacterium most commonly used in food products, as it is more robust than other species of Bifidobacterium genus. Amongst other characteristics, B. animalis subsp. lactis exhibits elevated oxygen tolerance, enabling it to survive in a wider range of environments. This probiotic species has also been shown to inhibit the toxic effects induced by the wheat protein gliadin, a component of wheat gluten. Wheat intolerance is becoming far more prevalent in modern society, but wheat products are staple foods in many cultures, so the potential of this bacterial species to help minimise some of the negative side effects of gluten consumption is attracting some interest.

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Clostridium

Optimal range: 0 - 20 Relative Abundance

Clostridium spp. is part of the intestinal indigenous microbiota and they can produce several endogenous infections.

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Clotridiales Incertae Sedis IV

Optimal range: 0 - 20 Relative Abundance

Linked to Parkinson’s disease

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Eggerthella lenta

Optimal range: 0 - 20 Relative Abundance

Eggerthella lenta is a normal human microflora that is anaerobic, non-sporulating, and Gram positive. However, an increasing number of studies have shown that it could also be an important pathogen for humans, even causing life-threatening infection under certain conditions. However, understanding its pathogenic mechanism and treatment options still need to be improved; more clinical data are needed to explore it further. The frequency of E. lenta bacteremia is increased in patients with hematologic or solid organ cancer, diabetes mellitus and also in those with appendicitis.

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Escherichia coli Nissle

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Escherichia coli Nissle is a Gram-negative strain with many prominent probiotic properties in the treatment of intestinal diseases such as diarrhea and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), in particular ulcerative colitis.

Escherichia coli Nissle not only exhibits antagonistic effects on a variety of intestinal pathogenic bacteria, but also regulates the secretion of immune factors in vivo and enhances the ability of host immunity.

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Faecalibacterium

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Possibly related to IBD

Faecalibacterium and Roseburia are major producers of butyrate in the intestine. A reduced abundance of the organisms and a concurrent reduction in butyrate levels are associated with inflammatory bowel disease.

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Farinins IgG

Optimal range: 0 - 0.9 Units

Non-gluten proteins constitute about 25% of the total protein content of wheat cereal. Recently it has been shown that these non-gluten proteins are immune-reactive in individuals with wheat sensitivity. The 5 groups of non-gluten proteins which are distinctly different from the gluten proteins that are responsible for inflammation in patients with wheat sensitivity are serpins, purinins, farinins, amylase/protease inhibitors and globulins.

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Gamma Gliadin IgG

Optimal range: 0 - 0.9 Units

Gliadin constitutes a class of proteins that are present in wheat and other cereal which give it the ability to rise properly when baked. The main types of gliadin are alpha, beta, gamma and omega gliadins. Research has suggested that antibody reactivity against all the above mentioned forms of gliadin are found in individuals with ‘Wheat related disorders.’

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Globulins IgG

Optimal range: 0 - 0.9 Units

Non-gluten proteins constitute about 25% of the total protein content of wheat cereal. Recently it has been shown that these non-gluten proteins are immune-reactive in individuals with wheat sensitivity. The 5 groups of non-gluten proteins which are distinctly different from the gluten proteins that are responsible for inflammation in patients with wheat sensitivity are serpins, purinins, farinins, amylase/protease inhibitors and globulins.

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Lactobacillus animalis

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Lactobacillus paracasei

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

LMW Glutenin IgG

Optimal range: 0 - 0.9 Units

Glutenin is a major protein found in wheat and constitutes about 47% of its protein content. Glutenin is responsible for the strength and elasticity of dough. The main types of glutenin are the LMW (low molecular weight) and the HMW (high molecular weight) glutenin.

HMW glutenin has been associated with Celiac disease, asthma and Atopic dermatitis.

LMW Glutenin has been associated with Celiac disease, asthma, Atopic dermatitis, Urticaria and Anaphylaxis.

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Omega Gliadin IgG

Optimal range: 0 - 0.9 Units

Gliadin constitutes a class of proteins that are present in wheat and other cereal which give it the ability to rise properly when baked. The main types of gliadin are alpha, beta, gamma and omega gliadins. Research has suggested that antibody reactivity against all the above mentioned forms of gliadin are found in individuals with ‘Wheat related disorders.’

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Oscillospira

Optimal range: 0 - 20 Relative Abundance

Oscillospira is a common yet rarely cultivated gut bacterial genus. Recently human gut microbiota studies have demonstrated its underlying significance for host health.

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Porphyromonas gingivalis

Optimal range: 0 - 20 Relative Abundance

Oral bacterium P. gingivalis has been well-documented as a mediator of periodontal disease. Furthermore, hosts harboring this pathogen have been shown to have greater risk for rheumatoid arthritis. Researchers are elucidating the mechanisms by which P. gingivalis contributes to the pathogenesis of arthritic and their related disorders. Upregulation of intestinal lipopolysaccharides and subsequent inflammation, as well as citrullination of alpha-enolase, which shares homology with human tissue α-enolase, are described mechanisms of autoimmunity. 

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Pseudobutyrivibrio

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Streptococcus

Optimal range: 10 - 100 Relative Abundance

Streptococcus is a member of Gram-positive lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB) that belonged to Firmicutes phylum. Many strains of Streptococcus are non-pathogenic and occur as commensal flora on the skin, the oral cavity, nasopharynx, upper respiratory tract, urogenital, and gastrointestinal tracts.

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Tyzzerella

Optimal range: 0 - 20 Relative Abundance