Blood Health

Your blood consists of two main components: the cellular components (red blood cells, white blood cells, and the cell fragments known as platelets); and the liquid component, called plasma. Together, these two parts of the blood are responsible for many functions, including oxygen transport, temperature regulation, blood clotting, and immune defense.

Ammonia

Optimal range: 11 - 55 µmol/L

Ammonia is a waste product naturally produced in the body. It primarily comes from the digestion of protein by bacteria in the intestines.

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C-Reactive Protein (CRP)

Optimal range: 0 - 1 mg/L

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general indicator of inflammation in the body. The inflammation can be acute and caused by infection or injury. Inflammation can also be chronic, which typically points toward more serious diseases.  High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) tests are commonly ordered to determine your risk of cardiovascular disease. 

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Ferritin

Optimal range: 18 - 270 µg/dL

Ferritin is a protein that serves as a storehouse for iron in the body. When iron supplies dwindle, ferritin releases some into the blood. Therefore, a blood ferritin test is an indication of how much iron is stored in the body. Iron is used primarily by red blood cells to carry oxygen to other cells, and as such Ferritin is vital to blood health. 

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Fibrinogen Activity

Optimal range: 196 - 441 mg/dL

It’s used to determine the level of fibrinogen in your blood. Fibrinogen, or factor I, is a blood plasma protein that’s made in the liver. Fibrinogen is one of 13 coagulation factors responsible for normal blood clotting.

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HAEMOGLOBIN (g/L)

Optimal range: 138 - 151 g/L

Haemoglobin A1c

Optimal range: 0 - 0 %

HAEMOGLOBINe

Optimal range: 138 - 151 g/L

The hematocrit test is often used to check for anemia, usually along with a hemoglobin test or as part of a complete blood count (CBC). The test may be used to screen for, diagnose, or monitor a number of conditions and diseases that affect the proportion of the blood made up of red blood cells (RBCs).

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Hemoglobin

Optimal range: 12 - 15.5 g/dL

Hemoglobin (Hb) is the iron-containing oxygen transportation protein in red blood cells. It's rate of binding oxygen depends on the number oxygen molecules already bound. 

 

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Iron

Optimal range: 70 - 175 µg/dL

The human body requires iron to perform many vital physiological functions. For instance, iron is the key component of hemoglobin which allows red blood cells to transport oxygen throughout the body. Iron in the blood is mostly bound to the transportation protein transferrin. Most iron in the body is bound to red blood cells or stored in the spleen and cannot be directly tested. 

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IRON (Serum)

Optimal range: 9 - 30.4 umol/L

Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH)

Optimal range: 135 - 214 U/L

Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme that helps the process of turning sugar into energy for your cells to use. LDH is present in many kinds of organs and tissues throughout the body, including the liver, heart, pancreas, kidneys, skeletal muscles, brain, and blood cells.

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Large Unstained Cells (LUC)

Optimal range: 0 - 0.4 x 10E3/ml

Large unstained cells are either large or reactive lymphocytes, monocytes or leukemic blasts. This marker is sometimes included in the automated laboratory test when looking at white blood cells. 

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Large Unstained Cells (Percent)

Optimal range: 0 - 4.5 %

Large unstained cells are either large or reactive lymphocytes, monocytes or leukemic blasts. This marker is sometimes included in the automated laboratory test when looking at white blood cells. 

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Magnesium

Optimal range: 1.8 - 2.5 mg/dL

Along with calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride, magnesium is one of the six essential minerals required by the human body in significant quantities. Involved in more than 300 enzyme reactions in the body, magnesium is necessary for bone formation, muscle activity, nerve transmission, energy production, and blood pressure regulation. It also plays an important role in blood sugar balance, as well as the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Low magnesium status is directly associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

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Magnesium, RBC

Optimal range: 4.2 - 6.8 mg/dL

Mean Cell Volume

Optimal range: 75 - 95 fL/red cell

Mean cell volume indicates the average volume of red blood cells in the body. It is often measured as a part of the red blood cell indices in a comprehensive blood count test. The results of the red blood cell indices will tell a healthcare professional whether or not anemia is present and, if so, what type it is.

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Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin (MCH)

Optimal range: 26.6 - 33 pg

Mean corpuscular (or cell) hemoglobin (abbreviated as MCH) is an estimate of the amount of hemoglobin in an average red blood cell. Hemoglobin is a substance in the blood that carries oxygen to the cells in the body from the lungs.

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Although closely related, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) are distinct measurements. While MCH represents the average amount of hemoglobin in a single red blood cell, MCHC reflects the hemoglobin concentration in a given unit of packed red blood cells. As with MCV and MCH, calculating the MCHC can help healthcare professionals better assess anemia and other blood disorders.

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Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV)

Optimal range: 80 - 96 fl

Mean corpuscular volume indicates the average volume of red blood cells in the body. It is often measured as a part of the red blood cell indices in a comprehensive blood count test. The results of the red blood cell indices will tell a healthcare professional whether or not anemia is present and, if so, what type it is.

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Mean Platelet Volume (MPV)

Optimal range: 7.5 - 11.5 fl

Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a calculation that indicates the average size of platelets in the blood. This measurement is typically done during a comprehensive blood count. An abnormal MPV is not, in it of itself, an indication of disease or disorder. MPV scores are compared against other types of blood counts to give a healthcare professional more information about a potential medical issue.

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Platelet count

Optimal range: 150 - 400 µl

Platelet count is a measure of how many platelets are present in the blood. Platelets are one of three types of blood cell, and their role is to aid in blood clotting. All three types of blood cell are assessed with a comprehensive blood count, which can be done as part of a general health check up or in response to specific symptoms.

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Plateletcrit (PCT)

Optimal range: 0.22 - 0.24 %

PCT is the volume occupied by platelets in the blood as a percentage and calculated according to the formula PCT = platelet count × MPV / 10,000 (25-27).

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RDW-CV (Red Cell Distribution Width)

Optimal range: 11.7 - 15 %

Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a measure of the average size of the red blood cells. RDW is assessed as a part of a comprehensive blood count, along with measures of white blood cells and platelets. An abnormal RDW score is not, in and of itself, cause for concern. A healthcare professional will need to compare an abnormal RDW score to other facets of the comprehensive blood count to identify a potential disorder.

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RDW-SD (Red Cell Distribution Width)

Optimal range: 39 - 46 fl

Red cell distribution width (abbreviated as RDW) is a measurement of the amount that red blood cells vary in size. Red blood cells help carry oxygen in the blood.

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Red Blood Cells (Erythrocytes / RBC)

Optimal range: 4.2 - 6.1 cells/mcL

Red blood cells (RBCs) are the most plentiful type of cell in the blood (~40% to 45% of the body's blood supply. They carry oxygen to the tissues and organs. They also bring back carbon dioxide back to the lungs so that it can be removed (exhaled) from the body. Red blood cells get their color from the protein hemoglobin. RBCs are constantly being replenished and they have a lifespan of around 120 days. 

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Special Stains

Optimal range: 0 - 0.001 Units

Thrombocytes

Optimal range: 150 - 400 µl

Thrombocytes are one of three types of blood cell found in our bodies. Along with red blood cells and white blood cells, thrombocyte levels are assessed with a comprehensive blood count, which can be done as a part of a general health check up or in response to specific symptoms.

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TIBC

Optimal range: 250 - 370 ug/dL

Total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to see if you have too much or too little iron in the blood. Iron is vital in that it transports oxygen around the body. Frequently, a TIBC is ordered along with several other tests to determine the cause of conditions like anemia or to assess blood health in general.

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Transferrin saturation

Optimal range: 20 - 35 %

Transferrin saturation (TSAT) is the ratio of serum iron and total iron-binding capacity. All three measurements are used to help determine the cause of iron levels that are abnormally high or abnormally low. TS may also be used to identify the presence and type of anemia.

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UIBC

Optimal range: 150 - 375 µg/dL

Unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC) is a blood test to see if you have too much or too little iron in the blood. Iron is vital in that it transports oxygen around the body. Frequently, A UIBC is ordered along with several other tests to determine the cause of conditions like anemia or to assess blood health in general.

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