Toxic & Essential Elements - Hair (Doctor's Data)

Hair is an excretory tissue for essential, nonessential and potentially toxic elements. In general, the amount of an element that is irreversibly incorporated into growing hair is proportional to the level of the element in other body tissues. Therefore, hair elements analysis provides an indirect screening test for physiological excess, deficiency or maldistribution of elements in the body. Clinical research indicates that hair levels of specific elements, particularly potentially toxic elements such as cadmium, mercury, lead and arsenic, are highly correlated with pathological disorders. For such elements, levels in hair may be more indicative of body stores than the levels in blood and urine.

All screening tests have limitations that must be taken into consideration. The correlation between hair element levels and physiological disorders is determined by numerous factors. Individual variability and compensatory mechanisms are major factors that affect the relationship between the distribution of elements in hair and symptoms and pathological conditions. It is also very important to keep in mind that scalp hair is vulnerable to external contamination of elements by exposure to hair treatments and products. Likewise, some hair treatments (e.g. permanent solutions, dyes, and bleach) can strip hair of endogenously acquired elements and result in false low values. Careful consideration of the limitations must be made in the interpretation of results of hair analysis. The data provided should be considered in conjunction with symptomology, diet analysis, occupation and lifestyle, physical examination and the results of other analytical laboratory tests.

Caution: The contents of this report are not intended to be diagnostic and the physician using this information is cautioned against treatment based solely on the results of this screening test. For example, copper supplementation based upon a result of low hair copper is contraindicated in patients afflicted with Wilson’s Disease.

Aluminium

Optimal range: 0 - 7 µg/g

Antimony

Optimal range: 0 - 0.05 µg/g

Possible sources of antimony: 
- Food and smoking are the usual sources of antimony. Thus cigarette smoke can externally contaminate hair, as well as contribute to uptake via inhalation. 
- Gunpowder (ammunition) often contains antimony. Firearm enthusiasts often have elevated levels of antimony in hair. 

Other possible sources are: 
- textile industry, 
- metal alloys, 
- and some anti-helminthic and anti-protozoal drugs. 
- Antimony is also used in the manufacture of paints, glass, ceramics, solder, batteries, bearing metals and semiconductors.

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Arsenic

Optimal range: 0 - 0.06 µg/g

Barium

Optimal range: 0 - 2 µg/g

Beryllium

Optimal range: 0 - 0.02 µg/g

Bismuth

Optimal range: 0 - 2 µg/g

Bismuth is found in alloys, catalysts, cosmetics, paints, magnets, ceramics, pharmaceuticals, x-ray contrast media,
and semiconductors. Bismuth is generally non-toxic, although very high levels may cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.
Renal, neurological, and hematological problems have been associated with bismuth toxicity. Hair is not a sensitive
specimen for bismuth toxicity; blood and urine are most commonly used.

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Boron

Optimal range: 0.25 - 1.5 µg/g

Cadmium

Optimal range: 0 - 0.05 µg/g

Calcium

Optimal range: 300 - 1200 µg/g

Chromium

Optimal range: 0.4 - 0.65 µg/g

Cobalt

Optimal range: 0.005 - 0.04 µg/g

Copper

Optimal range: 11 - 37 µg/g

Germanium

Optimal range: 0.03 - 0.04 µg/g

Iodine

Optimal range: 0.25 - 1.8 µg/g

Iron

Optimal range: 7 - 16 µg/g

Lead

Optimal range: 0 - 0.6 µg/g

Lithium

Optimal range: 0.007 - 0.02 µg/g

Magnesium

Optimal range: 35 - 120 µg/g

Manganese

Optimal range: 0.08 - 0.6 µg/g

Mercury

Optimal range: 0 - 0.8 µg/g

Molybdenum

Optimal range: 0.02 - 0.05 µg/g

Nickel

Optimal range: 0 - 0.3 µg/g

Phosphorus

Optimal range: 150 - 220 µg/g

Platinum

Optimal range: 0 - 0.005 µg/g

Potassium

Optimal range: 8 - 75 µg/g

Rubidium

Optimal range: 0.007 - 0.096 µg/g

Rubidium is a relatively benign element that typically parallels the potassium level. It varies according to levels found in water supplies. 

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Selenium

Optimal range: 0.55 - 1.1 µg/g

Silver

Optimal range: 0 - 0.15 µg/g

Sodium

Optimal range: 20 - 250 µg/g

Strontium

Optimal range: 0.5 - 7.6 µg/g

Sulfur

Optimal range: 44000 - 50000 µg/g

Thallium

Optimal range: 0 - 0.002 µg/g

Thorium

Optimal range: 0 - 0.002 µg/g

Tin

Optimal range: 0 - 0.3 µg/g

Titanium

Optimal range: 0 - 0.7 µg/g

Uranium

Optimal range: 0 - 0.06 µg/g

Vanadium

Optimal range: 0.018 - 0.065 µg/g

Zinc

Optimal range: 140 - 220 µg/g

Zirconium

Optimal range: 0.02 - 0.42 µg/g