Liver Health

Your liver’s main function is to filter blood coming from the digestive tract before passing it throughout the body. A vital organ, your liver is also responsible for detoxifying chemicals, metabolizing drugs, producing proteins, and more. Liver dysfunction can have a negative impact on your immune system and energy levels and can lead to liver disease and cancer.



Alanine-aminotransferase (ALT, SGPT)

Optimal range:  7 - 55 U/L

Alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) is an enzyme produced by the liver and is used to facilitate chemical reactions in the body. A high level of ALT in the blood is typically an indication of liver damage. ALT tests are frequently run along side other tests (such as an alkaline phosphatase test) to determine the source of liver damage. 

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Albumin, Serum

Optimal range:  3.4 - 5 g/dL

Albumin is a protein created by our liver and is used in a variety of functions throughout the body, including: tissue maintenance and transportation of molecules. Unusual albumin levels typically indicate liver disease or kidney disease.

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Albumin/Globulin (A/G) Ratio

Optimal range:  1 - 2 Ratio

The albumin to globulin (A/G) ratio has been used as an index of disease state, however, it is not a specific marker for disease because it does not indicate which specific proteins are altered.

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Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

Optimal range:  44 - 126 U/L

ALP is an enzyme generated most commonly in the liver, bones, and placenta. Its main function is to assist in the breakdown of proteins. ALP tests are typically ordered as an assessment of a liver or bone disease. 

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Aspartate-aminotransferase (AST, SGOT)

Optimal range:  10 - 34 U/L

Aspartate-aminotransferase (AST) and alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) are both produced by the liver and serve in functions throughout the human body. Aspartate-aminotransferase is most commonly related to liver health. Blood tests for AST and ALT are often ordered together to identify the source of damage in our organs. 

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Bilirubin Direct

Optimal range:  0 - 0.3 mg/dL

Bilirubin is a waste byproduct of the breakdown of red blood cells. Yellow in coloration, bilirubin is filtered out of the blood by the liver and excreted in stool by the intestines. Bilirubin tests are done when a disease or blockage of the liver is suspected. Direct bilirubin differs from indirect bilirubin in that it is bound to a sugar and is therefore water soluble. 

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Bilirubin Total

Optimal range:  0.1 - 1.23 mg/dL

Bilirubin is a waste byproduct of the breakdown of red blood cells. Yellow in coloration, bilirubin is filtered out of the blood by the liver and excreted in stool by the intestines. Bilirubin tests are done when a disease or blockage of the liver is suspected. 

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GGT

Optimal range:  0 - 38 U/L

GGT is an enzyme most commonly associated with the liver. GGT tests are often run to determine the cause and extent of liver damage or to monitor treatment of alcohol abuse disorders. While an elevated GGT score may be a cause for concern, a normal or low score is generally not.

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Globulin

Optimal range:  19 - 35 g/L

Globulins are a group of proteins in the blood stream that help to regulate the function of the circulatory system. 

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Total Protein, Serum

Optimal range:  6 - 8.3 g/dL

Total protein is a measure of two types of protein: albumin and globulin. Abnormal protein levels are seen in a number of disorders; therefore, total protein levels are often used, along with other tests, to diagnose things like liver disease and kidney disease.

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Other categories

Blood Health , Cardiovascular Health , Electrolytes , Metabolic Health , Vitamins & Minerals , Muscle Health , Kidney Health , White Blood Cells , Pancreas Health , Urinalysis , Immune System , Other , Stool , Gonadotropins , DUTCH , Endocrinology , Celiac Comprehensive Panel

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