OmegaCheck

Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids (PUFA) required by the body for proper functioning, normal growth and the formation of neural synapses and cellular membranes. Omega-3 and -6 fatty acids are considered “essential” and obtained primarily from dietary sources.

Three of the most important omega-3 fatty acids are eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Omega-3 fatty acids are primarily obtained from food sources. They have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-thrombotic effects, and can help to reduce triglyceride levels. Two of the most important omega-6 fatty acids are arachidonic acid (AA) and linoleic acid (LA). Omega-6 fatty acids are obtained from animal sources and plant oils, and have pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic properties at high levels.

- Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids reduces the occurrence of major acute cardiac events in healthy individuals or patients with cardiovascular risk factors or who have cardiovascular disease.

- Consumption of omega-3 fatty acids leads to a reduction in triglycerides and non-HDL, as well as Lp-PLA2 levels.

- A high intake of omega-6 fatty acid precursors can interfere with the absorption of omega-3 fatty acids. The mean omega-6:omega-3 ratio of the standard American diet is approximately 10:1. A diet with an omega-6:omega-3 fatty acid ratio of 4:1 or less may reduce total mortality up to 70% over 2 years. 

Arachidonic Acid

Optimal range: 8.6 - 15.6 % by wt

Arachidonic acid is an inflammatory omega-6 fatty acid. Our bodies produce this nutrient, and its excess may lead to inflammatory diseases and mood disorders.

LEARN MORE

Arachidonic Acid/EPA Ratio

Optimal range: 3.7 - 40.7 Ratio

DHA

Optimal range: 1.4 - 5.1 % by wt

Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is one of the omega-3 fatty acids.

Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3s) have a carbon–carbon double bond located three carbons from the methyl end of the chain. Omega-3s, sometimes referred to as “n-3s,” are present in certain foods such as flaxseed and fish, as well as dietary supplements such as fish oil. Several different omega-3s exist, but the majority of scientific research focuses on three: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). ALA contains 18 carbon atoms, whereas EPA and DHA are considered “long-chain” (LC) omega-3s because EPA contains 20 carbons and DHA contains 22.

LEARN MORE

DPA

Optimal range: 0.8 - 1.8 % by wt

Docosapentaenoic acid, or DPA, is a lesser known member of the omega-3 family.

LEARN MORE

EPA

Optimal range: 0.2 - 2.3 % by wt

Eicosapentaenoic Acid (EPA) is a Polyunsaturated Omega-3 Fatty Acid and is involved in the regulation of inflammatory processes and prevention of blood clots.

Omega-3 fatty acids (omega-3s) have a carbon–carbon double bond located three carbons from the methyl end of the chain. Omega-3s, sometimes referred to as “n-3s,” are present in certain foods such as flaxseed and fish, as well as dietary supplements such as fish oil. Several different omega-3s exist, but the majority of scientific research focuses on three: alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). ALA contains 18 carbon atoms, whereas EPA and DHA are considered “long-chain” (LC) omega-3s because EPA contains 20 carbons and DHA contains 22.

LEARN MORE

Linoleic Acid

Optimal range: 18.6 - 29.5 % by wt

Linoleic acid is by far the most abundant polyunsaturated fatty acid in most human tissues. Linoleic acid is an essential fatty acid, and low levels indicate dietary insufficiency.

LEARN MORE

Omega-3 total

Optimal range: 5.4 - 10 % by wt

Essential fatty acids are classified into fat "families": omega 3 fats and omega 6 fats.

LEARN MORE

Omega-6 total

Optimal range: 0 - 0 % by wt

Omega-6 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fat found in vegetable oils, nuts and seeds. When eaten in moderation and in place of the saturated fats found in meats and dairy products, omega-6 fatty acids can be good for your heart.

LEARN MORE

Omega-6/Omega-3 Ratio

Optimal range: 3.7 - 14.4 Ratio

Omega-6:Omega-3 ratio is calculated by dividing the sum of all the omega-6 fatty acids by the sum of all the omega-3 fatty acids.

LEARN MORE

OmegaCheck

Optimal range: 5.4 - 10 % by wt

This marker determines fatty acid-associated risk for cardiovascular events.

OmegaCheck = [(EPA + DPA + DHA) ÷ total PLFA] x 100

LEARN MORE