One Day Hormone Check (Genova Diagnostics)

The One Day Hormone Check is a salivary hormone test that evaluates unbound, bioavailable hormone levels over 24 hours. Specimens collected over 24 hours are examined for levels of estradiol, estrone, estriol, progesterone, the progesterone/estradiol ratio (P/E2), testosterone, cortisol, DHEA, and melatonin.

The One Day Hormone Check provides information about the impact that shifting hormone levels can have in men (andropause or male menopause) and women (perimenopause and menopause). It can reveal imbalances of primary sex hormones and how they relate to other hormones, such as DHEA, cortisol, and melatonin. Using hormone testing, clinicians can customize hormone and/or nutritional therapies and monitor therapy.

People with hormone imbalance may present with:

- Fatigue

- Weight loss or gain

- Menstrual irregularities

- Loss of libido

- Insomnia

- Changes in hair and skin

- Hot flashes

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Note on reference ranges:

The therapeutic ranges depicted are for informational purposes only, and were derived from a cohort of peri/menopausal women ranging in age from 37-62 years. All women were treated with bioidentical hormone therapy (HT) utilizing combinations of the following: Biest (transdermal); Progesterone (oral micronized); Testosterone (transdermal); and 7-keto-DHEA (oral).

DHEA (7AM - 9AM)

Optimal range: 71 - 640 pg/mL

DHEA is a hormone produced by both the adrenal gland and the brain. DHEA leads to the production of androgens and estrogens. DHEA levels in the body begin to decrease after age 30. Levels decrease more quickly in women.

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DHEA:Cortisol Ratio

Optimal range: 358 - 2538 Ratio

Estradiol (E2)

Optimal range: 2.9 - 13.7 pmol/L

Estrogens play a critical role in female sexual development, menstrual function, protein synthesis, cardiovascular function, bone formation and remodeling, cognitive function, emotional balance and other important health factors. The estrogenic potency of estradiol is 12 times that of estrone and 80 times that of estriol. Estradiol is the primary estrogen in premenopausal women. Estrone is the second most potent estrogen compared to estradiol.

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Estriol (E3)

Optimal range: 0 - 135 pmol/L

Estriol is considered to be the mildest and briefest-acting of the three estrogens.

Has weak estrogen activity. Considered to be a protective estrogen. Most prevalent estrogen in pregnancy.

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Estrone (E1)

Optimal range: 36.6 - 253.2 pmol/L

Produced by the ovaries, the estrone hormone is one of three types of estrogen, and it is one of the major hormones found in the bodies of postmenopausal women. While research into estrone function is still ongoing, largely due to the fact that it is the least powerful of the three types of estrogen, women should still understand this hormone and its known effects on the body.

- Weaker compared to Estradiol (Research says the estrogenic activity is about 4% of estradiol’s activity)

- Most abundant in menopause

- Made via aromatization in several tissues like fat and muscle

- Converts into estradiol (E2)

Estrone (E1) is also made by the ovary but in fat tissue in lesser quantities. While not as abundant in circulation as estradiol, estrone excess can still increase the risk for estrogen dominant cancers as well as estrogen dominant symptoms such as breast tenderness, heavy menstrual cycles, headaches, and erectile dysfunction and breast development in men just like estradiol. Estrone is commonly thought to be more abundant during menopause. 

Estradiol and estrone can interconvert into each other. 

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P/E2 Ratio

Optimal range: 10 - 106 Ratio

The P/E2 ratio describes the relationship between progesterone and estradiol levels, and is used clinically to ascertain dominance of one hormone compared to the other.

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Progesterone

Optimal range: 52 - 850 pmol/L

Progesterone is important for normal reproductive and menstrual function, and influences the health of bone, blood vessels, heart, brain, skin, and many other tissues and organs. As a precursor, progesterone is used by the body to make other steroid hormones, including DHEA, cortisol, estrogen and testosterone. In addition, progesterone plays an important role in mood, blood sugar balance, libido, and thyroid function, as well as adrenal gland health.

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Salivary Cortisol (10PM-12AM)

Optimal range: 0 - 0.034 mcg/dL

Cortisol is a stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands and is the primary agent used in our body’s flight or fight response to threatening stimuli.

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Salivary Cortisol (11AM-1PM)

Optimal range: 0.027 - 0.106 mcg/dL

Cortisol is a stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands and is the primary agent used in our body’s flight or fight response to threatening stimuli.

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Salivary Cortisol (3PM-5PM)

Optimal range: 0.013 - 0.068 mcg/dL

Cortisol is a stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands and is the primary agent used in our body’s flight or fight response to threatening stimuli.

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Salivary Cortisol (7AM-9AM)

Optimal range: 0.097 - 0.337 mcg/dL

Cortisol is a stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands and is the primary agent used in our body’s flight or fight response to threatening stimuli.

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Salivary Melatonin (2:30AM - 3:30AM)

Optimal range: 3.71 - 33.38 pg/mL

Melatonin is not technically an adrenal or sex hormone however it is highly involved in the entire endocrine system. It is made in small amounts in the pineal gland in response to darkness and stimulated by Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (MSH). A low MSH is associated with insomnia, an increased perception of pain, and mold exposure. Pineal melatonin (melatonin is also made in significant quantities in the gut) is associated with the circadian rhythm of all hormones (including female hormone release). It is also made in small amounts in the bone marrow, lymphocytes, epithelial cells and mast cells. Studies have shown that a urine sample collected upon waking has levels of 6-Hydroxymelatonin-sulfate (6-OHMS) that correlate well to the total levels of melatonin in blood samples taken continuously throughout the night. The DUTCH test uses the waking sample only to test levels of melatonin production. Low melatonin levels may be associated with insomnia, poor immune response, constipation, weight gain or increased appetite. Elevated melatonin is usually caused by ingestion of melatonin through melatonin supplementation or eating melatonin-containing foods. Elevated melatonin production that is problematic is rare, but levels can be higher in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and may be phase shifted (peaking later) in some forms of depression.

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Salivary Melatonin (3PM-5PM)

Optimal range: 0 - 1.97 pg/mL

Melatonin is not technically an adrenal or sex hormone however it is highly involved in the entire endocrine system. It is made in small amounts in the pineal gland in response to darkness and stimulated by Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (MSH). A low MSH is associated with insomnia, an increased perception of pain, and mold exposure. Pineal melatonin (melatonin is also made in significant quantities in the gut) is associated with the circadian rhythm of all hormones (including female hormone release). It is also made in small amounts in the bone marrow, lymphocytes, epithelial cells and mast cells. Studies have shown that a urine sample collected upon waking has levels of 6-Hydroxymelatonin-sulfate (6-OHMS) that correlate well to the total levels of melatonin in blood samples taken continuously throughout the night. The DUTCH test uses the waking sample only to test levels of melatonin production. Low melatonin levels may be associated with insomnia, poor immune response, constipation, weight gain or increased appetite. Elevated melatonin is usually caused by ingestion of melatonin through melatonin supplementation or eating melatonin-containing foods. Elevated melatonin production that is problematic is rare, but levels can be higher in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and may be phase shifted (peaking later) in some forms of depression.

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Salivary Melatonin (7AM-9AM)

Optimal range: 0 - 12.12 pg/mL

Melatonin is not technically an adrenal or sex hormone however it is highly involved in the entire endocrine system. It is made in small amounts in the pineal gland in response to darkness and stimulated by Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone (MSH). A low MSH is associated with insomnia, an increased perception of pain, and mold exposure. Pineal melatonin (melatonin is also made in significant quantities in the gut) is associated with the circadian rhythm of all hormones (including female hormone release). It is also made in small amounts in the bone marrow, lymphocytes, epithelial cells and mast cells. Studies have shown that a urine sample collected upon waking has levels of 6-Hydroxymelatonin-sulfate (6-OHMS) that correlate well to the total levels of melatonin in blood samples taken continuously throughout the night. The DUTCH test uses the waking sample only to test levels of melatonin production. Low melatonin levels may be associated with insomnia, poor immune response, constipation, weight gain or increased appetite. Elevated melatonin is usually caused by ingestion of melatonin through melatonin supplementation or eating melatonin-containing foods. Elevated melatonin production that is problematic is rare, but levels can be higher in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and may be phase shifted (peaking later) in some forms of depression.

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Testosterone

Optimal range: 34 - 183 pmol/L

Testosterone is an androgenic sex steroid/hormone that helps maintain libido, influences muscle mass and weight loss, and plays a role in the production of several other hormones. During the aging process, testosterone levels gradually decline in both sexes, which can lead to loss of bone density. Testosterone concentrations tend to be higher in men versus women.

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