Optimal Result: 0 - 0.38 mmol/mol creatinine.

Alternative names:

Dihydroxyphenylpropionate

What is 3,4 Dihydroxyphenylpropionate?

3,4-Dihydroxyphenylpropionate seems to be strongly associated with a troublesome type of bacteria called Clostridia.

What is Clostridia?

This organism is frequently the cause of travelers diarrhea, but its by-products may produce other symptoms.

Clostridium species constitute a major portion of the bacteria of the lower ileum and colon. Being strictly anaerobic, they are difficult to culture from stool and are not reported on most stool cultures.

Cases of confirmed Clostridium overgrowth show elevated levels of Dihydroxyphenylpropionate, which fall to baseline with Flagyl treatment, but are unaffected by nystatin.

Further info on Dihydroxyphenylpropionate:

In health, beneficial intestinal bacteria produce some B-vitamins and provide stimulus for proper immune function. However, if your stomach acid is not adequate, if you fail to digest protein, or if your diet does not supply sufficient fiber, the resulting overgrowth of unfavorable bacteria can release toxic products that your body must remove. These toxic products include Dihydroxyphenylpropionate.

References:

- https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19152477

- Laboratory Evaluations for Integrative and Functional Medicine, edited by Richard S. Lord, J. Alexander Bralley

What does it mean if your DHPPA (Beneficial Bacteria) result is too high?

High DHPPA (3,4 dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid) indicates excessive intake of chlorogenic acid, a common substance found in beverages and in many fruits and vegetables, including apples, pears, tea, coffee, sunflower seeds, carrots, blueberries, cherries, potatoes, tomatoes, eggplant, sweet potatoes, and peaches. Harmless or beneficial bacteria such as Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria, and E. coli mediate the breakdown of chlorogenic acid to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid (DHPPA), and high values may indicate increased amounts of these species in the GI tract. In addition, one Clostridia species, C. orbiscindens, can convert the flavanoids luteolin and eriodictyol, occurring only in a relatively small food group that includes parsley, thyme, celery, and sweet red pepper to 3,4-dihydroxyphenylpropionic acid. The quantity of Clostridia orbiscindens in the GI tract is negligible (approximately 0.1% of the total bacteria) compared to the predominant flora of Lactobacilli, Bifidobacteria, and E. coli. Consequently, this marker is essentially useless as a general Clostridia marker but may be a good indicator of the presence of beneficial flora.

Possible causes:

- Clostridium overgrowth and/ or malabsorption of tryptophan, tyrosine and/or phenlyalanine

Additional investigations:

- Investigate possible causes of malabsorption

- Intestinal Permeability

- IgG Food Sensitivity

- Complete Digestive Stool Analysis

Treatment considerations:

- Antimicrobials

- Probiotics

- Mucosal support

- Betaine HCl

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