Understand your Blood Lab Results quickly!

Blood Health

Your blood consists of two main components: the cellular components (red blood cells, white blood cells, and the cell fragments known as platelets); and the liquid component, called plasma. Together, these two parts of the blood are responsible for many functions, including oxygen transport, temperature regulation, blood clotting, and immune defense.


Ammonia

Optimal range:   11 - 55 µmol/L

Ammonia is a waste product naturally produced in the body. It primarily comes from the digestion of protein by bacteria in the intestines.

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C-Reactive Protein (CRP)

Optimal range:   0 - 1 mg/L

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general indicator of inflammation in the body. The inflammation can be acute and caused by infection or injury. Inflammation can also be chronic, which typically points toward more serious diseases.  High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) tests are commonly ordered to determine your risk of cardiovascular disease. 

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Ferritin

Optimal range:   18 - 270 µg/dL , 3.222 - 48.33 µmol/L , 18 - 270 ng/mL , 18 - 270 ug/L

Ferritin is a protein that serves as a storehouse for iron in the body. When iron supplies dwindle, ferritin releases some into the blood. Therefore, a blood ferritin test is an indication of how much iron is stored in the body. Iron is used primarily by red blood cells to carry oxygen to other cells, and as such Ferritin is vital to blood health. 

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Fibrinogen Activity

Optimal range:   196 - 441 mg/dL

It’s used to determine the level of fibrinogen in your blood. Fibrinogen, or factor I, is a blood plasma protein that’s made in the liver. Fibrinogen is one of 13 coagulation factors responsible for normal blood clotting.

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HAEMOGLOBIN (g/L)

Optimal range:   138 - 151 g/L

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Haemoglobin A1c

Optimal range:   0 - 0 %

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HAEMOGLOBINe

Optimal range:   138 - 151 g/L , 13.8 - 15.1 g/dL

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Hematocrit (HCT) / Packed Cell Volume (PCV)

Optimal range:   34.9 - 50 %

The hematocrit test is often used to check for anemia, usually along with a hemoglobin test or as part of a complete blood count (CBC). The test may be used to screen for, diagnose, or monitor a number of conditions and diseases that affect the proportion of the blood made up of red blood cells (RBCs).

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Hemoglobin

Optimal range:   12 - 15.5 g/dL , 120 - 155 g/L

Hemoglobin (Hb) is the iron-containing oxygen transportation protein in red blood cells. It's rate of binding oxygen depends on the number oxygen molecules already bound. 

 

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Iron

Optimal range:   70 - 175 µg/dL , 12.53 - 31.325 µmol/L , 70 - 175 umol/L

The human body requires iron to perform many vital physiological functions. For instance, iron is the key component of hemoglobin which allows red blood cells to transport oxygen throughout the body. Iron in the blood is mostly bound to the transportation protein transferrin. Most iron in the body is bound to red blood cells or stored in the spleen and cannot be directly tested. 

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IRON (Serum)

Optimal range:   9 - 30.4 umol/L

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Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH)

Optimal range:   135 - 214 U/L

Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is an enzyme that helps the process of turning sugar into energy for your cells to use. LDH is present in many kinds of organs and tissues throughout the body, including the liver, heart, pancreas, kidneys, skeletal muscles, brain, and blood cells.

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Large Unstained Cells (LUC)

Optimal range:   0 - 0.4 x 10E3/ml

Large unstained cells are either large or reactive lymphocytes, monocytes or leukemic blasts. This marker is sometimes included in the automated laboratory test when looking at white blood cells. 

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Large Unstained Cells (Percent)

Optimal range:   0 - 4.5 %

Large unstained cells are either large or reactive lymphocytes, monocytes or leukemic blasts. This marker is sometimes included in the automated laboratory test when looking at white blood cells. 

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Magnesium

Optimal range:   1.8 - 2.5 mg/dL , 0.7398 - 1.0275 mmol/L

Along with calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, and chloride, magnesium is one of the six essential minerals required by the human body in significant quantities. Involved in more than 300 enzyme reactions in the body, magnesium is necessary for bone formation, muscle activity, nerve transmission, energy production, and blood pressure regulation. It also plays an important role in blood sugar balance, as well as the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Low magnesium status is directly associated with increased risk of metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.

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Magnesium, RBC

Optimal range:   4.2 - 6.8 mg/dL

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Mean Cell Volume

Optimal range:   75 - 95 fL/red cell , 75 - 95 fl

Mean cell volume indicates the average volume of red blood cells in the body. It is often measured as a part of the red blood cell indices in a comprehensive blood count test. The results of the red blood cell indices will tell a healthcare professional whether or not anemia is present and, if so, what type it is.

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Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin (MCH)

Optimal range:   26.6 - 33 pg

Mean corpuscular (or cell) hemoglobin (abbreviated as MCH) is an estimate of the amount of hemoglobin in an average red blood cell. Hemoglobin is a substance in the blood that carries oxygen to the cells in the body from the lungs.

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Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin Concentration (MCHC)

Optimal range:   32 - 35 g/dL , 19.9 - 21.765625 mmol/L , 320 - 350 g/L

Although closely related, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) are distinct measurements. While MCH represents the average amount of hemoglobin in a single red blood cell, MCHC reflects the hemoglobin concentration in a given unit of packed red blood cells. As with MCV and MCH, calculating the MCHC can help healthcare professionals better assess anemia and other blood disorders.

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Mean Corpuscular Volume (MCV)

Optimal range:   80 - 96 fl

Mean corpuscular volume indicates the average volume of red blood cells in the body. It is often measured as a part of the red blood cell indices in a comprehensive blood count test. The results of the red blood cell indices will tell a healthcare professional whether or not anemia is present and, if so, what type it is.

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Mean Platelet Volume (MPV)

Optimal range:   7.5 - 11.5 fl

Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a calculation that indicates the average size of platelets in the blood. This measurement is typically done during a comprehensive blood count. An abnormal MPV is not, in it of itself, an indication of disease or disorder. MPV scores are compared against other types of blood counts to give a healthcare professional more information about a potential medical issue.

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Platelet count

Optimal range:   150 - 400 µl , 150 - 400 x10^9/L , 150 - 400 x10/9/l

Platelet count is a measure of how many platelets are present in the blood. Platelets are one of three types of blood cell, and their role is to aid in blood clotting. All three types of blood cell are assessed with a comprehensive blood count, which can be done as part of a general health check up or in response to specific symptoms.

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Plateletcrit (PCT)

Optimal range:   0.22 - 0.24 %

PCT is the volume occupied by platelets in the blood as a percentage and calculated according to the formula PCT = platelet count × MPV / 10,000 (25-27).

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RDW-CV (Red Cell Distribution Width)

Optimal range:   11.7 - 15 %

Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a measure of the average size of the red blood cells. RDW is assessed as a part of a comprehensive blood count, along with measures of white blood cells and platelets. An abnormal RDW score is not, in and of itself, cause for concern. A healthcare professional will need to compare an abnormal RDW score to other facets of the comprehensive blood count to identify a potential disorder.

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RDW-SD (Red Cell Distribution Width)

Optimal range:   39 - 46 fl

Red cell distribution width (abbreviated as RDW) is a measurement of the amount that red blood cells vary in size. Red blood cells help carry oxygen in the blood.

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Red Blood Cells (Erythrocytes / RBC)

Optimal range:   4.2 - 6.1 cells/mcL , 4.2 - 6.1 x10^12/L , 4.2 - 6.1 x10/12/l

Red blood cells (RBCs) are the most plentiful type of cell in the blood (~40% to 45% of the body's blood supply. They carry oxygen to the tissues and organs. They also bring back carbon dioxide back to the lungs so that it can be removed (exhaled) from the body. Red blood cells get their color from the protein hemoglobin. RBCs are constantly being replenished and they have a lifespan of around 120 days. 

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Special Stains

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

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Thrombocytes

Optimal range:   150 - 400 µl

Thrombocytes are one of three types of blood cell found in our bodies. Along with red blood cells and white blood cells, thrombocyte levels are assessed with a comprehensive blood count, which can be done as a part of a general health check up or in response to specific symptoms.

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TIBC

Optimal range:   250 - 370 ug/dL , 44.75 - 66.23 µmol/L , 250 - 370 umol/L , 250 - 370 g/L

Total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) is a blood test to see if you have too much or too little iron in the blood. Iron is vital in that it transports oxygen around the body. Frequently, a TIBC is ordered along with several other tests to determine the cause of conditions like anemia or to assess blood health in general.

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Transferrin saturation

Optimal range:   20 - 35 %

Transferrin saturation (TSAT) is the ratio of serum iron and total iron-binding capacity. All three measurements are used to help determine the cause of iron levels that are abnormally high or abnormally low. TS may also be used to identify the presence and type of anemia.

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UIBC

Optimal range:   150 - 375 µg/dL , 26.85 - 67.125 µmol/L , 150 - 375 umol/L

Unsaturated iron-binding capacity (UIBC) is a blood test to see if you have too much or too little iron in the blood. Iron is vital in that it transports oxygen around the body. Frequently, A UIBC is ordered along with several other tests to determine the cause of conditions like anemia or to assess blood health in general.

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Cardiovascular Health

Your cardiovascular system is made up of your heart and blood vessels, and is responsible for transporting oxygen, nutrients, hormones, and waste products throughout the body. A healthy cardiovascular system ensures a good balance of nutrients and optimal brain and body function.


Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR)

Optimal range:   1 - 20 mm/hr

The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR or sed rate) is a relatively simple, inexpensive, non-specific test that has been used for many years to help detect inflammation associated with conditions such as infections, cancers, and autoimmune diseases.

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HDL

Optimal range:   39 - 180 mg/dL , 1.0101 - 4.662 mmol/L

High-density lipoprotein or “good” cholesterol is known to decrease the risk of heart attack and stroke by removing “bad” cholesterol from the blood. It is typically assessed through a lipid profile, which measures “good” cholesterol, “bad” cholesterol, and total cholesterol. A healthcare professional may order a lipid profile when an individual is at an increased risk for heart disease or routinely in healthy adults to monitor cardiovascular health.

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hsCRP

Optimal range:   0 - 0.8 mg/L

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general indicator of inflammation in the body. The inflammation can be acute and caused by infection or injury. Inflammation can also be chronic, which typically points toward more serious diseases.  High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) tests are commonly ordered to determine your risk of cardiovascular disease.

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LDL

Optimal range:   0 - 99 mg/dL , 0 - 2.5641 mmol/L

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), or “bad” cholesterol, is known to increase risk of heart attack and stroke when levels become elevated in the blood. LDL-C is measured as a part of a lipid profile, which is used to determine your risk for developing cardiovascular disease. LDL-C can usually be controlled through a combination of lifestyle changes and medication. 

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LDL/HDL Cholesterol Ratio

Optimal range:   0.5 - 3 Ratio

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Total Cholesterol

Optimal range:   100 - 199 mg/dL , 2.59 - 5.1541 mmol/L

Your total cholesterol score is calculated using the following equation: HDL + LDL + 20 percent of your triglyceride level. With HDL cholesterol, higher levels are better. Low HDL cholesterol puts you at a higher risk for heart disease. With LDL cholesterol, lower levels are better. High LDL cholesterol puts you at a higher risk for heart disease.

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Total Cholesterol/HDL Ratio

Optimal range:   0 - 5 Ratio

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Triglycerides

Optimal range:   0 - 149 mg/dL , 0 - 1.6837 mmol/L

Triglycerides are a type of fat and the primary way our bodies store unused energy. While triglycerides are necessary for a healthy life, excessive amounts can put you at a higher risk for developing cardiovascular disease. Typically, a healthcare professional will look at triglyceride levels along with high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol to determine your risk of heart disease.

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VLDL

Optimal range:   2 - 36 mg/dL

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Electrolytes

An electrolyte imbalance can lead to an imbalance in your body’s acid-base status, hydration, or conduction of charges across cells, all of which are essential, especially with increased activity.


Anion Gap

Optimal range:   3 - 11 mEq/L

An anion gap refers to the difference of positively and negatively charged molecules in the body. A gap that is unusually high or low frequently indicates a problem with the respiratory system, kidneys, or bones. Anion gap blood tests cover a large range of molecules and are more efficacious when narrowed to a few possibilities. 

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Calcium, Serum

Optimal range:   9.3 - 9.9 mg/dL , 2.325 - 2.475 mmol/L

Calcium is a mineral used by our bodies in a variety of physiological functions including the construction and maintenance of bones, which is where most of our calcium is stored.  It is necessary to continually ingest calcium throughout a lifetime, because our bodies perpetually lose it. Typically, calcium levels in the body need to be extremely low or extremely high before problems start occurring. 

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Carbon Dioxide (CO2)

Optimal range:   18 - 29 mEq/L , 18 - 29 mmol/L

Carbon dioxide exists most plentifully in the body in the form of bicarbonate. An essential electrolyte, carbon dioxide is filtered out of the body through the kidneys and the lungs. An unusual bicarbonate level in the blood typically points to either a problem with the kidneys, a problem with the lungs, or a metabolic problem. Carbon dioxide tests are often ordered along with several other tests to determine the cause of many simultaneous symptoms. 

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Chloride, Serum

Optimal range:   97 - 108 mEq/L , 97 - 108 mmol/L

Chloride is an electrolyte used by our bodies to maintain blood pH balance, fluid balance, and blood pressure. The kidneys filter chloride out of the blood and into urine. Chloride tests are almost always ordered as a part of a larger panel. Typically, these panels are used to determine the cause of kidney problems or a pH level that is too acidic or too basic. 

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Potassium, Serum (Kalium)

Optimal range:   3.6 - 5 mmol/L

Potassium is both a positively charged electrolyte and a mineral. It helps keep the water balance inside and outside our body’s cells equal. Potassium is also important in how nerves work. Potassium tests can be used to diagnose cardiovascular problems, but the most common cause of significantly elevated potassium in the blood is kidney disease.

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Sodium, Serum (Natrium)

Optimal range:   137 - 144 mmol/L

Sodium is a vital electrolyte found in our bodies. It helps our cells to maintain fluid balance and aids in nerve and muscle function. An abnormal level of sodium in the blood is typically caused by extreme excess or extreme deficiency of water. This can be due to common things like vomiting/diarrhea or more a serious condition like kidney disease. A healthcare professional will likely need to compare an unusual blood sodium level to other biomarkers in order to determine the cause, if it is not readily apparent.

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Zinc

Optimal range:   60 - 130 µg/dL , 9.18 - 19.89 µmol/L

Zinc is a primary nutrient that we need to thrive. It’s used in a variety of functions through the body including wound healing and creation of DNA. In North America, zinc deficiencies are rare and an unusually high level of zinc in the blood usually indicates iron deficiency or lead poisoning.

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Liver Health

Your liver’s main function is to filter blood coming from the digestive tract before passing it throughout the body. A vital organ, your liver is also responsible for detoxifying chemicals, metabolizing drugs, producing proteins, and more. Liver dysfunction can have a negative impact on your immune system and energy levels and can lead to liver disease and cancer.


Alanine-aminotransferase (ALT, SGPT)

Optimal range:   7 - 55 U/L , 7 - 55 IU/L

Alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) is an enzyme produced by the liver and is used to facilitate chemical reactions in the body. A high level of ALT in the blood is typically an indication of liver damage. ALT tests are frequently run along side other tests (such as an alkaline phosphatase test) to determine the source of liver damage. 

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Albumin, Serum

Optimal range:   3.4 - 5 g/dL , 34 - 50 g/L

Albumin is a protein created by our liver and is used in a variety of functions throughout the body, including: tissue maintenance and transportation of molecules. Unusual albumin levels typically indicate liver disease or kidney disease.

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Albumin/Globulin (A/G) Ratio

Optimal range:   1 - 2 Ratio

The albumin to globulin (A/G) ratio has been used as an index of disease state, however, it is not a specific marker for disease because it does not indicate which specific proteins are altered.

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Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP)

Optimal range:   44 - 126 U/L , 44 - 126 IU/L

ALP is an enzyme generated most commonly in the liver, bones, and placenta. Its main function is to assist in the breakdown of proteins. ALP tests are typically ordered as an assessment of a liver or bone disease. 

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Aspartate-aminotransferase (AST, SGOT)

Optimal range:   10 - 34 U/L , 10 - 34 IU/L

Aspartate-aminotransferase (AST) and alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) are both produced by the liver and serve in functions throughout the human body. Aspartate-aminotransferase is most commonly related to liver health. Blood tests for AST and ALT are often ordered together to identify the source of damage in our organs. 

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Bilirubin Direct

Optimal range:   0 - 0.3 mg/dL , 0 - 5.13 µmol/L

Bilirubin is a waste byproduct of the breakdown of red blood cells. Yellow in coloration, bilirubin is filtered out of the blood by the liver and excreted in stool by the intestines. Bilirubin tests are done when a disease or blockage of the liver is suspected. Direct bilirubin differs from indirect bilirubin in that it is bound to a sugar and is therefore water soluble. 

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Bilirubin Indirect

Optimal range:   0.2 - 0.9 mg/dL

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Bilirubin Total

Optimal range:   0.1 - 1.23 mg/dL , 1.71 - 21.033 µmol/L

Bilirubin is a waste byproduct of the breakdown of red blood cells. Yellow in coloration, bilirubin is filtered out of the blood by the liver and excreted in stool by the intestines. Bilirubin tests are done when a disease or blockage of the liver is suspected. 

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GGT

Optimal range:   0 - 38 U/L , 0 - 38 IU/L

GGT is an enzyme most commonly associated with the liver. GGT tests are often run to determine the cause and extent of liver damage or to monitor treatment of alcohol abuse disorders. While an elevated GGT score may be a cause for concern, a normal or low score is generally not.

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Globulin

Optimal range:   19 - 35 g/L , 1900 - 3500 mg/dL , 1.9 - 3.5 g/dL

Globulins are a group of proteins in the blood stream that help to regulate the function of the circulatory system. 

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Total Protein, Serum

Optimal range:   6 - 8.3 g/dL , 60 - 83 g/L

Total protein is a measure of two types of protein: albumin and globulin. Abnormal protein levels are seen in a number of disorders; therefore, total protein levels are often used, along with other tests, to diagnose things like liver disease and kidney disease.

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Metabolic Health

Metabolism is your body’s way of chemically processing sugar and fat for use throughout the body as energy. An optimal metabolism supports healthy weight control and energy levels, while a dysfunctional metabolism can lead to undesired fluctuations in weight and fatigue or hyperactivity.


Free Androgen Index

Optimal range:   0 - 6.6 u

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FREE T3

Optimal range:   2.6 - 5.7 pmol/L

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Free T4

Optimal range:   0.7 - 1.53 ng/dL , 9.009 - 19.6911 pmol/L

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Free testosterone

Optimal range:   8.7 - 25.1 pg/mL

Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone in humans. A healthcare professional may order a free testosterone blood test if you’re experiencing sexual problems or a secondary condition, like hyperthyroidism, is suspected.  

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Free Thyroxine

Optimal range:   0.6 - 1.2 ng/dL , 0.6 - 1.2 pmol/L

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Glucose

Optimal range:   3.6075 - 5.55 mmol/L , 3.6075 - 5.55 mmol/L

Glucose is a simple sugar used as a primary energy source in our bodies. Blood glucose tests are most frequently ordered for the diagnoses and monitoring of diabetes. 

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Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase

Optimal range:   0 - 0.5 nmol/L

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Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c)

Optimal range:   4.8 - 5.6 %

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Homocysteine

Optimal range:   0 - 10 µmol/L , 0 - 10 umol/L

Homocysteine is an amino acid that requires vitamin B12 and folate to be used by our bodies. As such, homocysteine blood tests are often ordered to identify vitamin B12 / folate deficiency.  Rarely, an abnormally high level of homocysteine indicates a rare genetic disorder called homocystinuria.

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IGF-1

Optimal range:   114 - 492 ng/dL

IGF-1 measurements are adjusted for age because levels tend to decrease as you get older.

Results of IGF-1 are given in nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL). Normal ranges by age are:

- 182 to 780 ng/mL for ages 16 to 24

- 114 to 492 ng/mL for ages 25 to 39

- 90 to 360 ng/mL for ages 40 to 54

- 71 to 290 ng/mL for people 55 and older

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Reverse T3, Serum

Optimal range:   9.2 - 24.1 ng/dL

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SHBG

Optimal range:   10 - 33 nmol/L

Sex hormone-binding globulin is a protein that binds primarily to testosterone, making it biologically unusable by our bodies. For this reason, an abnormal level of SHBG indicates that too much or too little testosterone is present in the tissues. In men, this can cause sexual issues like erectile dysfunction or infertility. In women, it can cause irregular menstruation or excess facial hair growth. A healthcare professional may order a SHBG test when total testosterone levels do not fit with one or more of the above-mentioned symptoms.

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Testosterone

Optimal range:   468 - 1197 ng/dL , 16.2396 - 41.5359 nmol/L , 4.68 - 11.97 ng/mL

Testosterone is the primary male sex hormone in humans. Testosterone blood tests can assess testosterone that is bound to a protein, testosterone that is free in the blood, or both. A healthcare professional may order any of these tests if you’re experiencing sexual or hormonal problems.

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Testosterone (Female/Child)

Optimal range:   0 - 1.7 nmol/L

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Thyroglobulin Antibodies

Optimal range:   0 - 4 IU/ml

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Thyroid Peroxidase (TPO) Antibodies

Optimal range:   0 - 9 IU/ml

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Thyroid-Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

Optimal range:   0.5 - 4.5 mIU/L , 0.5 - 4.5 IU/L

A thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) blood test is used to check for thyroid gland problems. TSH is produced when the hypothalamus releases a substance called thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). TRH then triggers the pituitary gland to release TSH.

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Thyroxine (T4)

Optimal range:   4.5 - 12 ug/dL

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Total T3

Optimal range:   0.8 - 2 ng/mL

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Triiodothyronine, Serum

Optimal range:   2 - 4.4 pg/mL

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Vitamins & Minerals

Vitamins and minerals are substances obtained from food and supplements needed for normal growth and body processes. Deficiencies in certain vitamins and minerals can interfere with normal body function.


Calcitriol (1,25 di-OH Vit D)

Optimal range:   19.9 - 79.3 pg/mL

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Folate (Folic Acid)

Optimal range:   5.3 - 20 ng/mL , 12.0098 - 45.32 nmol/L

Folate belongs to the B vitamin family and is used for healthy cell development.  Folate is water-soluble and is expelled daily in urine. For this reason, it is important that our diets have enough folate in them to make up for the loss. Deficiency can easily be caused by conditions that impair absorption in the digestive tract. 

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Phosphate

Optimal range:   2.5 - 4.5 mg/dL , 2.5 - 4.5 mmol/L

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Vitamin A

Optimal range:   18 - 77 ug/dL

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Vitamin B1

Optimal range:   66.5 - 200 nmol/L

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Vitamin B12

Optimal range:   300 - 647 pg/mL , 221.4 - 477.486 pmol/L

Vitamin B12 is essential in many basic bodily functions. High levels are not usually cause for concern, but low levels may indicate a medical deficiency or disease. In America, food such as cereal and grains are enriched with many essential vitamins, including vitamin B12. For this reason, dietary deficiency is rare.

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Vitamin C

Optimal range:   0.2 - 2.3 mg/dL

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Vitamin D, 25-Hydroxy

Optimal range:   40 - 60 ng/mL , 99.84 - 149.76 nmol/L

Vitamin D, frequently called the “sun vitamin,” is an essential component of the systems that our bodies use to keep bones and teeth strong. It also has important, emerging roles in immune function and cancer prevention. We have natural processes that regulate vitamin D production from the sun so extremely high levels of it are rare. Deficiency can cause a number of issues including weak bones, called osteomalacia.

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Muscle Health

Keeping your muscles healthy will help you to be able to walk, run, jump, lift things, play ... Healthy muscles let you move freely and keep your body strong.


Creatine kinase

Optimal range:   24 - 204 U/L , 0.408 - 3.468 µkat/L , 24 - 204 IU/L

Creatine kinase (CK) is an enzyme that our muscles release into the bloodstream in response to physical damage. CK tests are often run to diagnose a heart attack or determine the extent of a sports related injuy. 

 

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Kidney Health

Your kidneys help maintain blood pressure, keep the blood's acid-base level within a healthy range, and filter the blood so nutrients are absorbed and waste is passed out of the body as urine. Your kidney function reflects how well your kidneys are filtering your blood. Abnormal kidney function could result in the accumulation of waste products in the body, which can cause fatigue, headaches, nausea, and more.


Blood urea nitrogen (BUN)

Optimal range:   7 - 28 mg/dL , 2.499 - 9.996 mmol/L

Urea nitrogen is a waste product formed in our bodies and is filtered out of the blood and into urine by our kidneys. While low levels are not indicative of a problem, unusually high levels always point toward kidney dysfunction.

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BUN/Creatinine Ratio

Optimal range:   10 - 20 :1 ratio

The BUN/Creatinine ratio is useful in the differential diagnosis of acute or chronic renal disease.

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Creatinine, Serum

Optimal range:   0.6 - 1.2 mg/dL , 53.04 - 106.08 µmol/L , 0.6 - 1.2 umol/L

Creatinine is formed by the breakdown of creatine, a key molecule in muscular metabolism. Our kidneys are responsible for removing creatinine from the blood and expelling it in urine. Therefore, blood creatinine levels are a good indicator of how well the kidneys are working. 

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Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR)

Optimal range:   60 - 120 mL/min per 1.73 m2

eGFR stands for estimated glomerular filtration rate. Your eGFR score is a reflection of your blood test for creatinine, a waste product formed in muscular metabolism. It estimates how well your kidneys are working.

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Uric Acid

Optimal range:   3.4 - 7.2 mg/dL , 202.232 - 428.256 µmol/L , 3.4 - 7.2 umol/L

Uric acid is a natural byproduct formed during the breakdown of our body’s cells and the food that we eat. Excess uric acid can be caused by either an overproduction of uric acid or inefficient removal of it from the blood. The most common affliction associated with excess uric acid is gout, a painful form of arthritis.

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White Blood Cells

Although your white blood cells account for only about 1 percent of your blood, their impact is significant. White blood cells, also called leukocytes, are essential for good health and protection against illness and disease. Think of white blood cells as your immunity cells. In a sense, they are continually at war. They flow through your bloodstream to battle viruses, bacteria, and other foreign invaders that threaten your health. When your body is in distress and a particular area is under attack, white blood cells rush in to help destroy the harmful substance and prevent illness. White blood cells are produced inside the bone marrow and stored in your blood and lymphatic tissues. Because some white blood cells have a short lifespan of one to three days, your bone marrow is constantly producing them.


Band Neutrophils

Optimal range:   0 - 6 %

Band neutrophils are the immature form of a white blood cell found in our bodies. All white blood cells act as a defense mechanism against stress and infection. An unusually high level of band neutrophils typically indicates the presence of a bacterial infection or inflammation of tissue. 

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Basophils (Absolute)

Optimal range:   0 - 0.1 cells/uL , 0 - 0.1 cells/uL

Basophils are a type of white blood cell found in the body. All white blood cells are produced in response to infection or inflammation. Basophils are specialized in their large size and ability to “eat” other cells like bacteria. A blood test to assess white blood cell functioning is typically ordered to determine the existence or cause of infection / inflammation. 

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Basophils (Percent)

Optimal range:   0 - 1 %

Basophils are a type of white blood cell found in the body. All white blood cells are produced in response to infection or inflammation. Basophils are specialized in their large size and ability to “eat” other cells like bacteria. A blood test to assess white blood cell functioning is typically ordered to determine the existence or cause of infection / inflammation. 

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Eosinophils (Absolute)

Optimal range:   0.015 - 0.5 cells/uL , 0.015 - 0.5 cells/uL

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell found in the body and play an important role in the removal of germs and allergen-related inflammatory response. Generally, an eosinophil count is ordered when a white blood cell count came back as abnormal. Your healthcare professional can then use the eosinophil test to identify the cause of the abnormality. 

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Eosinophils (Percent)

Optimal range:   1 - 6 %

Eosinophils are a type of white blood cell found in the body and play an important role in the removal of germs and allergen-related inflammatory response. Generally, an eosinophil count is ordered when a white blood cell count came back as abnormal. Your healthcare professional can then use the eosinophil test to identify the cause of the abnormality. 

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Lymphocytes (Absolute)

Optimal range:   1.5 - 3.5 cells/mcL , 0.0015 - 0.0035 cells/uL

Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell found in the body. They serve in several major roles in our immune system including identification of and response to invading organism. Your healthcare professional may assess lymphocyte levels when a white blood cell count came back as abnormal.

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Lymphocytes (Percent)

Optimal range:   20 - 40 %

Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell found in the body. They serve in several major roles in our immune system including identification of and response to invading organism. Your healthcare professional may assess lymphocyte levels when a white blood cell count came back as abnormal.

More info


Monocytes (Absolute)

Optimal range:   0.2 - 0.9 K/MCL , 0.2 - 0.9 abs , 0.2 - 0.9 x10^9/L

Monocytes are a type of white blood cell found in the body. Their primary function is a scavenger of damaged or dead cells, but they also aid in inflammatory response and the adaptive immune response, along with the four other types of white blood cell. Monocyte count is determined with a white blood cell differential.

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Monocytes (Percent)

Optimal range:   2 - 8 %

Monocytes are a type of white blood cell found in the body. Their primary function is a scavenger of damaged or dead cells, but they also aid in inflammatory response and the adaptive immune response, along with the four other types of white blood cell. Monocyte count is determined with a white blood cell differential.

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Neutrophils (Absolute)

Optimal range:   1.4 - 7 cells/mcL , 0.0014 - 0.007 cells/uL

Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cell in the body. They are phagocytic, meaning that they engulf and destroy things like bacteria and viruses at the site of an injury. Like all other white blood cells, they also play a part in our body’s inflammatory response to things like allergens.

More info


Neutrophils (Percent)

Optimal range:   50 - 70 %

Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cell in the body. They are phagocytic, meaning that they engulf and destroy things like bacteria and viruses at the site of an injury. Like all other white blood cells, they also play a part in our body’s inflammatory response to things like allergens.

More info


Polymorphs

Optimal range:   40 - 75 %

Polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells refer to the group of white cells known as granulocytes. The three types of granulocytes are:

Neutrophils

Basophils

Eosinophils

More info


Segmented Neutrophils

Optimal range:   1.5 - 8.5 cells/mcL

Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cell in the found. They are phagocytic, meaning that they engulf and destroy things like bacteria and viruses at the site of an injury. Like all other white blood cells, they also play a part in our body’s inflammatory response to things like allergens. 

More info


Segmented Neutrophils (Percent)

Optimal range:   47 - 55 %

Neutrophils are the most abundant type of white blood cell found in the body. They are phagocytic, meaning that they engulf and destroy things like bacteria and viruses at the site of an injury. Like all other white blood cells, they also play a part in our body’s inflammatory response to things like allergens. 

 

More info


White blood cells (Leucocytes / WBC)

Optimal range:   4.5 - 10.8 x10E3/µL , 4.5 - 10.8 x10^9/L , 4.5 - 10.8 x10/9/l

White blood cells are the muscle of our body’s immune system. They serve to identify invasive microorganisms, isolate them, destroy them, and remember their weaknesses for later. There are five types of white blood cells, and they’re all measured with a blood differential test. Typically, this test is ordered when a complete blood count comes back as abnormal.

More info



Pancreas Health

The pancreas is a glandular organ in the digestive system and endocrine system of vertebrates. In humans, it is located in the abdominal cavity behind the stomach. It is an endocrine gland producing several important hormones, including insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide which circulate in the blood. The pancreas is also a digestive organ, secreting pancreatic juice containing digestive enzymes that assist digestion and absorption of nutrients in the small intestine. These enzymes help to further break down the carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids in the chyme.


Amylase

Optimal range:   25 - 115 U/L

Our bodies use amylase for the digestion of carbohydrates. Primarily the pancreas produces it, and unusual levels of amylase in the blood may point to a problem with the pancreas or the gynecological organs in women. An amylase test is often done along with a lipase test to assess pancreatic health.

More info


Lipase

Optimal range:   23 - 160 U/L

Lipase is an enzyme produced by the pancreas and is used for digestion. Therefore, abnormal lipase levels are usually indicative of a pancreatic disorder. A healthcare professional may order a lipase test to diagnose or monitor such a condition.

More info


Trypsin

Optimal range:   169 - 773 ng/mL

More info



Urinalysis

Urinalysis is a test that evaluates a sample of your urine. Urinalysis is used to detect and assess a wide range of disorders, such as urinary tract infection, kidney disease and diabetes. Urinalysis involves examining the appearance, concentration and content of urine.


Arsenic (Inorganic), Urine

Optimal range:   0 - 19 ug/L

More info


Arsenic (Total), Urine

Optimal range:   0 - 50 ug/L

More info


Arsenic, Urine 24 Hr

Optimal range:   0 - 50 ug/24 hr

More info


Cadmium, Urine

Optimal range:   0 - 1 ug/L

More info


Chloride, Urine

Optimal range:   110 - 250 mmol/24 hr

More info


Coproporphyrin I

Optimal range:   5.6 - 28.6 mcg/g creat

More info


Coproporphyrin III

Optimal range:   4.1 - 76.4 mcg/g creat

More info


Creatinine (CRT), Urine

Optimal range:   0.3 - 3 g/L

More info


Heptacarboxyporphyrin

Optimal range:   0 - 2.9 mcg/g creat

More info


Hexacarboxyporphyrin

Optimal range:   0 - 5.4 mcg/g creat

More info


Lead, Urine

Optimal range:   0 - 49 ug/L

More info


Mercury, Urine

Optimal range:   0 - 19 ug/L

More info


Mercury, Urine 24 Hr

Optimal range:   0 - 20 ug/24 hr

More info


Mercury/Creatinine Ratio, Urine

Optimal range:   0 - 5 ug/g creat

More info


Pentacarboxyporphyrin

Optimal range:   0 - 3.5 mcg/g creat

More info


Porphyrins

Optimal range:   50 - 300 mg

Porphyrins are natural chemicals in the body that help form many important substances in the body. One of these is hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen in the blood.

More info


Potassium, Urine

Optimal range:   25 - 125 mmol/24 hr

More info


Sodium, Urine

Optimal range:   39 - 258 mmol/24 hr

More info


Total Porphyrins

Optimal range:   23.3 - 132.4 mcg/g creat

More info


Urine Occult Blood

Optimal range:   0 - 0 mg/d

Urine occult blood is a test to determine if there is blood present in the urine and is done, along with several other tests, during a routine analysis of the urine. Although some urine in the blood isn’t unusual, it can also indicate severe problems with the kidneys or cancer.

More info


Urine pH

Optimal range:   5 - 8 pH

Urine pH is a test to assess the pH level of your urine and is done, along with several other tests, during a routine analysis of the urine. Although some fluctuation of urine pH is normal, excessively acidic or alkaline urine can indicate a problem with the kidneys or digestive system.

More info


Urine Specific Gravity

Optimal range:   1.001 - 1.035 SG

Urine specific gravity is a test to assess the concentration of your urine and is done, along with several other tests, during a routine analysis of the urine. An abnormal urine specific gravity test likely indicates a problem with the kidneys or heart.

More info


Uroporphyrin I

Optimal range:   3.1 - 18.2 mcg/g creat

More info


Uroporphyrin III

Optimal range:   0 - 4.8 mcg/g creat

More info



Immune System

The immune system is a network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend the body against attacks by “foreign” invaders. These are primarily microbes—tiny organisms such as bacteria, parasites, and fungi that can cause infections.


Antinuclear Antibodies Direct (ANA Direct)

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


Rheumatoid factor

Optimal range:   0 - 13.9 IU/ml

A rheumatoid factor test measures the amount of rheumatoid factor in your blood. Rheumatoid factors are proteins produced by your immune system that can attack healthy tissue in your body.

More info



Other

This category includes all markers that do not fall into any of the other categories.


Anti DNAse B Titer

Optimal range:   0 - 251 U/mL

More info


Bordetella Pertussis (IgG/IgM)

Optimal range:   0 - 0.94 index

More info


CD1656

Optimal range:   100 - 1000 U/L

More info


CD19

Optimal range:   200 - 2100 U/L

More info


CD3

Optimal range:   900 - 4500 U/L

More info


CD4

Optimal range:   500 - 2400 U/L

More info


CD4/CD8 Ratio

Optimal range:   2 - 4 Ratio

More info


CD8

Optimal range:   300 - 1600 U/L

More info


Coenzyme Q10

Optimal range:   0.44 - 1.64 mg/L

More info


Diptheria Antibodies

Optimal range:   0.1 - 0.3 IU/ml

More info


Heliocobater Pylori Antibody IgA (ARUP)

Optimal range:   0 - 1.7 EV

More info


Interleukin-6

Optimal range:   0 - 15.5 pg/mL

More info


Mercury

Optimal range:   0 - 14.9 ug/L

More info


Metanephrine Plasma

Optimal range:   0 - 62 pg/mL

More info


Normetanephrine

Optimal range:   0 - 145 pg/mL

More info


Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA)

Optimal range:   0 - 4 ng/mL

More info


Pyruvate

Optimal range:   0.3 - 1.5 mg/dL

More info


Tetanus Antibodies

Optimal range:   0.1 - 0.5 IU/ml

More info


Tumor Necrosis Factor

Optimal range:   0 - 8.1 pg/mL

More info


Varicella-Zoster Antibody, IgG

Optimal range:   1.1 - 10 AI

More info



Stool

In this category we look at digestion, absorbtion, gut immunology, gut metabolism, gut microbiology, beneficial bacteria and fecal fats.


Acetate

Optimal range:   44.5 - 72.4 %

More info


Beneficial SCFAs

Optimal range:   13.6 - 50 micromol/g

More info


Bilfidobacterium

Optimal range:   4 - 10 Units

More info


Calprotectin

Optimal range:   0 - 50 mcg/g

More info


Cholesterol (Stool)

Optimal range:   0.2 - 3.5 mg/g

More info


Chymotrypsin

Optimal range:   0.9 - 26.8 U/g

More info


Deoxycholic acid (DCA)

Optimal range:   0.67 - 6.76 mg/g

More info


Eosinophil Protein X

Optimal range:   0 - 4.6 mcg/g

More info


Escherichia coli

Optimal range:   2 - 10 Units

More info


Fecal Fat

Optimal range:   2.6 - 32.4 mg/g

More info


Lactobacillus species

Optimal range:   2 - 10 Units

More info


LCA / DCA Ratio

Optimal range:   0.39 - 2.07 Ratio

More info


Lithocholic acid (LCA)

Optimal range:   0.65 - 5.21 mg/g

More info


Long Chain Fatty Acids (Stool)

Optimal range:   1.3 - 23.7 mg/g

More info


n-Butyrate

Optimal range:   2.5 - 10 %

More info


Pancreatic Elastase 1

Optimal range:   200 - 1000 mcg/g

More info


Phospholipids

Optimal range:   0.2 - 8.8 mg/g

More info


Propionate

Optimal range:   0 - 32.1 %

More info


Putrefactive SCFAs

Optimal range:   1.3 - 8.6 micromol/g

More info


Stool pH

Optimal range:   6.1 - 7.9 pH

More info


Triglycerides (Stool)

Optimal range:   0.2 - 3.3 mg/g

More info



Gonadotropins

The gonadotropins are peptide hormones that regulate ovarian and testicular function and are essential for normal growth, sexual development and reproduction. The human gonadotropins include follicle stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone which are made in the pituitary, and chorionic gonadotropin which is made by the placenta.


Follicle-Stimulating Hormone (FSH)

Optimal range:   4.7 - 21.5 IU/L

Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is a pituitary hormone that regulates growth, sexual development and reproduction, including menstruation, follicular development and ovulation.

More info


Luteinizing Hormone (LH)

Optimal range:   5 - 25 IU/L

Luteinizing hormone (LH) is a pituitary hormone that is essential for sexual development and reproduction in both men and women. 

More info


Prolactin

Optimal range:   102 - 496 mU/L

More info



DUTCH

Dried Urine Test for Comprehensive Hormones


16-OH-E1

Optimal range:   1 - 3.5 ng/mg

More info


2-Methoxy-E1

Optimal range:   2 - 5.5 ng/mg

More info


2-OH-E1

Optimal range:   4.6 - 14.4 ng/mg

More info


2-OH-E2

Optimal range:   0 - 1.2 ng/mg

More info


24hr Free Cortisol

Optimal range:   80 - 185 ug

More info


24hr Free Cortisone

Optimal range:   220 - 400 ug

More info


4-OH-E1

Optimal range:   0 - 1.8 ng/mg

More info


5a-Androstanediol

Optimal range:   12 - 30 ng/mg

More info


5a-DHT

Optimal range:   0 - 8.8 ng/mg

More info


5b-Androstanediol

Optimal range:   20 - 75 ng/mg

More info


8-OHdG (Waking)

Optimal range:   0 - 4.5 ng/mg

More info


a-Pregnanediol

Optimal range:   580 - 3000 ng/mg

More info


a-Tetrahydrocortisol (a-THF)

Optimal range:   75 - 265 ng/mg

More info


Androsterone

Optimal range:   399 - 1364 ng/mg

More info


b-Pregnanediol

Optimal range:   2000 - 9000 ng/mg

More info


b-Tetrahydrocortisol (b-THF)

Optimal range:   1050 - 2070 ng/mg

More info


b-Tetrahydrocortisone (b-THE)

Optimal range:   1550 - 3150 ng/mg

More info


Cortisol A (Waking)

Optimal range:   12 - 40 ng/mg

More info


Cortisol B (Morning)

Optimal range:   38 - 120 ng/mg

More info


Cortisol C (Afternoon)

Optimal range:   7.3 - 21 ng/mg

More info


Cortisol D (Night)

Optimal range:   0 - 10 ng/mg

More info


Cortisone A (Waking)

Optimal range:   40 - 100 ng/mg

More info


Cortisone B (Morning)

Optimal range:   90 - 200 ng/mg

More info


Cortisone C (Afternoon)

Optimal range:   32 - 80 ng/mg

More info


Cortisone D (Night)

Optimal range:   0 - 42 ng/mg

More info


Creatinine A (Waking)

Optimal range:   0.2 - 2 mg/ml

More info


Creatinine B (Morning)

Optimal range:   0.2 - 2 mg/ml

More info


Creatinine C (Afternoon)

Optimal range:   0.2 - 2 mg/ml

More info


Creatinine D (Night)

Optimal range:   0.2 - 2 mg/ml

More info


DHEAS (Urin)

Optimal range:   23 - 350 ng/mg

More info


Epi-Testosterone

Optimal range:   4.5 - 22.3 ng/mg

More info


Estradiol(E2)

Optimal range:   1.8 - 4.5 ng/mg

More info


Estriol(E3)

Optimal range:   5 - 18 ng/mg

More info


Estrone(E1)

Optimal range:   12 - 26 ng/mg

More info


Etiocholanolone

Optimal range:   371 - 765 ng/mg

More info


Melatonin (Waking)

Optimal range:   10 - 50 ng/mg

More info


Metabolized Cortisol (THF+THE)

Optimal range:   2750 - 5400 ng/mg

More info


Progesterone (Urine)

Optimal range:   6 - 20 ng/mL

Although progesterone is found in both males and females, it is primarily known for its role in conception, pregnancy, and the regulation of a woman’s menstrual cycle.

More info


Testosterone (DUTCH)

Optimal range:   4 - 14 ng/mg

More info


Total DHEA Production

Optimal range:   400 - 3000 ng/mg

More info


Total Estrogen

Optimal range:   27 - 62 ng/mg

More info



Endocrinology

Endocrinology is the study of medicine that relates to the endocrine system, which is the system that controls hormones. An endocrinologist will deal with diseases that are caused by problems with hormones.


ACTH, Plasma

Optimal range:   7.2 - 63.3 pg/mL

More info


ADH

Optimal range:   0 - 4.7 pg/mL

More info


Aldos/Renin Ratio

Optimal range:   0 - 30 ng/dL per ng/mL/hr

More info


Aldosterone

Optimal range:   0 - 30 ng/dL

More info


Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH)

Optimal range:   5.5 - 37.4 pmol/L

Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) is a protein hormone produced by cells within the ovary. Understanding your AMH level can help to assess your ovarian egg reserve and therefore your fertility.

More info


Cortisol

Optimal range:   2.3 - 19.4 µg/dL , 63.457 - 535.246 nmol/L

Cortisol is a stress hormone produced by the adrenal glands and is the primary agent used in our body’s flight or fight response to threatening stimuli. Levels naturally peak in the morning and then reach their lowest point at night. A high blood cortisol level at night may indicate a problem with the adrenal glands; however, individuals who work at night and sleep during the day will have an inversed pattern.

More info


Cortisol - AM

Optimal range:   6.2 - 19.4 ug/dL

More info


DHEAS (Serum)

Optimal range:   9.58 - 405.306 mcg/dL , 0.259618 - 10.9837926 umol/L

It stands for Dehydroepiandrosterone and is a building block of steroid hormones that is produced predominantly in the adrenal glands.

More info


Oestradiol

Optimal range:   45.4 - 1461 pmol/L

More info


Progesterone (Serum)

Optimal range:   0.3 - 50.6 nmol/L

More info


Renin Activity, Plasma

Optimal range:   0.167 - 5.38 ng/mL/hr

More info



Celiac Comprehensive Panel


Deamidated Gliadin Abs, IgA

Optimal range:   0 - 19 Units

More info


Deamidated Gliadin Abs, IgG

Optimal range:   0 - 19 Units

More info


Endomysial Antibody IgA

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


IgG, Subclass 1

Optimal range:   422 - 1292 mg/dL

More info


IgG, Subclass 2

Optimal range:   117 - 747 mg/dL

More info


IgG, Subclass 3

Optimal range:   41 - 129 mg/dL

More info


IgG, Subclass 4

Optimal range:   1 - 291 mg/dL

More info


Immunoglobulin A, Qn, Serum

Optimal range:   87 - 352 mg/dL

More info


Immunoglobulin D, Quant, Serum

Optimal range:   0 - 14.11 mg/dL

More info


Immunoglobulin E, Total

Optimal range:   0 - 100 IU/ml

More info


Immunoglobulin G, Qn, Serum

Optimal range:   700 - 1600 mg/dL

More info


Immunoglobulin M, Qn, Serum

Optimal range:   40 - 230 mg/dL

More info


t-Transglutaminase (tTG) IgA

Optimal range:   0 - 3 U/mL

More info


t-Transglutaminase (tTG) IgG

Optimal range:   0 - 5 U/mL

More info



Lyme Testing


18 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


23 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


23 KD (IGM) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


28 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


30 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


39 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


39 KD (IGM) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


41 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


41 KD (IGM) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


45 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


58 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


66 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


93 KD (IGG) Band

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


Bartonella Henselae Ab, Igg

Optimal range:   0 - 0.015625 Units

More info


Bartonella Henselae Ab, Igm

Optimal range:   0 - 0.0625 Units

More info


Borrelia Burgdorferi IGG ABS -IB

Optimal range:   0 - 0.9 Units

More info


Borrelia Burgdorferi IGM ABS -IB

Optimal range:   0 - 0.9 Units

More info


C6 Qual Result

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


CD8-CD57 + Lymphs (Absolute)

Optimal range:   60 - 360 uL

More info


CD8-CD57 + Lymphs (Percent)

Optimal range:   2 - 17 %

More info


CMV-IgG Antibody

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


EBV-VCA, IgG

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info


Lyme Disease AB (IGG), Blot

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 index

More info


Lyme Disease AB (IGM), Blot

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 index

More info


Lyme Disease Screen

Optimal range:   0 - 0.9 index

More info


Lyme Index (C6 ELISA)

Optimal range:   0 - 0.91 index

More info


Lyme WB IgM

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 Units

More info



Candida IgA, IgM, IgG Blood Test

This candida test is used to screen for antibodies the body develops in response to Systemic Candidiasis or Candida.  Candida is another name for yeast, a fungus which is normally found in small amounts in the body.  The immune system normally keeps Candida under control but in cases where a person is sick or taking antibiotics the yeast may spread, becoming a potentially dangerous infection.  This candida test looks for 3 antibody types including Iga, IgM and IgG


Candida Antibodies IgA

Optimal range:   0 - 9 U/mL

More info


Candida Antibodies IgG

Optimal range:   0 - 29 U/mL

More info


Candida Antibodies IgM

Optimal range:   0 - 9 U/mL

More info



Babesiosis

Babesiosis is a malaria-like parasitic disease caused by infection with Babesia, a genus of Apicomplexa. Human babesiosis is an uncommon but emerging disease in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States and parts of Europe, and sporadic throughout the rest of the world.


Babesia duncani, IgG

Optimal range:   0 - 40 Units

More info


Babesia duncani, IgM

Optimal range:   0 - 20 Units

More info


Babesia microti, IgG

Optimal range:   0 - 40 Units

More info


Babesia microti, IgM

Optimal range:   0 - 20 Units

More info


WA1 IgG Antibody, IFA

Optimal range:   0 - 0.0039 Units

WA1, also known as Babesia duncani, has been associated with symptoms similar to those caused by Babesia microti. Little, if any, crossreactivity occurs between Babesia microti and WA1.

More info



Infectious Disease Profile


Hepatitis A Virus Antibody

Optimal range:   0 - 1 index

More info


Hepatitis B Core Antibody (Total)

Optimal range:   0 - 0.5 index

More info


Hepatitis B Surface Antibody

Optimal range:   0 - 7.5 index

More info


Hepatitis B Surface Antigen

Optimal range:   0 - 1 index

More info


Hepatitis C Virus Antibody

Optimal range:   0 - 0.8 index

More info


HIV-1/HIV-2 Antibodies -EIA

Optimal range:   0 - 1 index

More info


Treponema Palladium Total Antibodies (FTA abs)

Optimal range:   0 - 0.001 index

More info



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